Category Archives: Painting

Walking While Musing, Episode 5

In this episode of walking while musing the wind almost got the better of me.

I am sharing the content anyway because the message is poignant.

Please turn down the sound on your device. I published this video at 18% of the volume of sound that I captured, but it is still very loud! Try to imagine wind at 100% volume and speed—that is what I was experiencing while balanced on top of a fallen log at the top of a sand dune and rotating 360° while talking and filming.

Like me, I invite you to use the wind to let go of past pain and hurt, and/or allow the difficulty of change to blow through you.

Please enjoy the following painting with curiosity and contemplation calmly after the storm of the video.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Double Meaning, Flashe paint and other media on wood cradled panel, 14 x 11 inches, $375

May you go into nature to heal. Breathe. Namaste.

Walking While Musing, Episode 4

This walking (sitting) while musing video focuses on the search for a path.

The constant search for a path in life, art, relationships, and more is explored while I sit on a log in this video. For many years now my exploration for a best path as an artist has been relentless. Thankfully, nature gives me pause and room to breathe.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Terrible, Flashe paint and other media on wood cradled panel, 14 x 11 inches, $375

Through these walking musings I will eventually learn to explain what the words unrestrained containment mean to me as the underlying concept in my work. You’ll see and hear in this video that discussing the meaning of unrestrained containment is currently very difficult for me. In time, I suspect more words will be available to explain my ideas, for now I will allow my art to do the communication of ideas.

Instead of walking, I am sitting in this video. Nature is my muse. Enjoy the video.

 

Continue to give yourself the space for contemplation and curiosity. Breathe. Namaste.

Art-O-Mat Doodle Character—Second Set of 100

I make 100 pieces of art for Art-O-Mat about twice per year.

This blog post is dedicated to showing you my process of making Art-O-Mat Art, my second Set of 100 doodle characters for 2018.

As soon as the blocks arrive, I open the box, dump them out and line them up for paint on 5 sides. This initial step is the groundwork for the fun part of the project.

The fun process starts with paper and watercolor or gouache, I paint the bodies on heavy paper. Working intuitively and trusting that I will be able to fit “bodies” onto the limbs in the form of clothing that I collage over the stick figures. I always make about 20% more than I need so that I have room for error and do not have to come back to this step.

Suzanne Gibbs ©2018, Dorky Doodle Darling for Art-O-Mat. 100 drawings on wood blocks made with flashe paint, ink, watercolor, PVA adhesive, and paper.

Collecting and ripping up tons of security envelopes that I have saved to be repurposed in this project is a job I can do while talking to my husband. These small pieces of patterned paper will become clothing.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Doodle Art Blocks for Art-O-Mat, series of 100, process image

Gluing the “outfits” onto the limbs is so much fun because at this stage the character that they will become begins to be obvious to me.

Suzanne Gibbs ©2018, Dorky Doodle Darling for Art-O-Mat. 100 drawings on wood blocks made with flashe paint, ink, watercolor, PVA adhesive, and paper.

Once they all have clothes on, I cut the heavy paper in half and stack them up for the next step.

Suzanne Gibbs ©2018, Dorky Doodle Darling for Art-O-Mat. 100 drawings on wood blocks made with flashe paint, ink, watercolor, PVA adhesive, and paper.

The faces! The mouths are the most fun, so I started with them. I forgot to take process pictures of the rest of the embellishments I do. I think this is mostly because I have to concentrate to add precisely the right details to keep the characters fun, but to also give them a story of depth beyond the stick figure they started out as.

Suzanne Gibbs ©2018, Dorky Doodle Darling for Art-O-Mat. 100 drawings on wood blocks made with flashe paint, ink, watercolor, PVA adhesive, and paper.

Once I am happy with all of the further drawing and details, then each card is glued to a block with PVA adhesive (a type of archival adhesive used in book binding). I stacked them with additional paper between each one while they dried to make sure the front images stayed clean and unmarred.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Doodle Art Blocks for Art-O-Mat, series of 100, process image

After I cut around the edges and clean them up, each block gets a word on the bottom side of the block. Often the word matched the character, or at least in my mind and imagination the word makes sense!

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Doodle Art Blocks for Art-O-Mat, series of 100, process image, words for thought.

Once they are dry and checked for quality, I ship them off, back to Art-O-Mat for distribution.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Doodle Art Blocks for Art-O-Mat, series of 100, process image, stacks of finished product.

This little character stayed home with me, I simply could not part with the adorable expression.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Doodle Art Blocks for Art-O-Mat, series of 100, process image

From my previous batch of doodle characters, 10 were sold at The Smithsonian in Washington DC! The rest were sold in different places in batches of 10 or 20. I find it very exciting that my art gets to go all over the world!

Suzanne Gibbs ©2018, Image of SOLD location of a Doodle block.

Art-O-Mat Doodle Character Art, Second Set of 100 is finished!

September 2018 Sketchbook

Suzanne Gibbs Art September 2018 Sketchbook is ready!

Each month I fill a sketchbook and share it here on my blog. Comments, suggestions, ideas, and questions are welcome!

My sketchbooks are made for ME, and generously shared!

  1. Sketchbooks are my dumpling ground.
  2. I see something that I feel like drawing. I pick up my sketchbook and chunky Stabilo Woodies, gouache paint, or watercolor and just make the mess that needs to be expressed!
  3. I do not have a plan for these pages.
  4. Sometimes the pages are ugly.
  5. Sometimes the pages are notes, because the paper happens to be the most handy paper around when I need it.
  6. Sometimes I am doodling or capturing ideas from phone calls.
  7. Anything goes!
  8. I do not rip pages out!
  9. I do not work in sequential order.
  10. I do sometimes go back to a page and add more to it on a totally different day.
  11. I sometimes vandalize my own work with a thick layer of paint or collage.
  12. My sketchbooks are raw and unedited work that lays the groundwork for more specialized fine art work.

Suzanne Gibbs ©2018, Face Detail, sketchbook page.


Suzanne Gibbs Art ©2018, video sketchbook tour.

Suzanne Gibbs ©2018, 1/2 Faces drawn in my sketchbook.

Page spread from September 2018 sketchbook of Suzanne Gibbs.

100 Postcards Project

In September 2018 my goal was to make 100 painted art postcards.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, 100 Postcard Series, Mixed Media, varied sizes.

100 Postcards Project required that I paint every single day. Painting smaller did not take take less time to accomplish and finish than my larger grid paintings (see below). I thought they would, I was mistaken. I found I was more concerned with details in these smaller sized art postcards. Also, necessarily I had to work with a much smaller paint brush.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Don’t Know, Flashe paint and other media on wood cradled panel, 16 x 16 inches, $480

Unfortunately, I must be honest here and report that I did not reach my goal of 100 finished postcards in September. However, I did get paint on 100 postcards in September. Through shear tenacity, late nights, and early mornings I almost reached my goal. I have 10 to finish as of this writing. How did I do it?

I kept making 100 postcards!

Even when the project seemed endless I continued to paint. When I was questioning my own sanity, I changed things up a bit. Below is an image of a card I did when I challenged myself to paint with watercolor in 1/8 inch squares! Yes, you read that right! Very tiny squares.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, 100 Postcard Series, #9, Mixed Media, varied sizes, $9

I hope to do a large painting in 2019 using this method of 1/8 inch squares + watercolor. Can you imagine how exquisite watercolor squares would be to view from far away and from close-up in tiny 1/8 inch increments of paint?

As I made more and more work, and as I was sharing the project on social media, I began noticing more fans and likes on Instagram. As a spoof on my own excitement at the momentum I was generating I began taking images of my 100 postcards in batches of 3-10—in fan shapes!

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, 100 Postcard Series, Mixed Media, varied sizes, $9.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, 100 Postcard Series, Mixed Media, varied sizes, $9

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, 100 Postcard Series, Mixed Media, varied sizes, $9

Were you wondering if I use a ruler to draw straight lines?

A few people asked me this question during my month of creating 100 Postcards. I do not use rulers. Everything I painted and drew freehand. However, I do work on a cutting board that has a grid and this gives me visual reference of a grid and straight lines.

I mix paint in batches of 6 colors, with lots of water!

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, 100 Postcard Series, sample of mixing paint tray.

My singular focus on grids veered into a new direction when I had leftover paint and not enough time. I grabbed a larger brush and made organic shapes with the left-over paint on Fabriano postcard paper. I set these aside to dry. A few days later I saw faces in the paint. Faces! If you have followed my work at all, you already know I love painting faces almost as much as I love painting grids.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, 100 Postcard Series, Mixed Media, varied sizes, $9.

Even the faces I painted were treated to grid treatment!

Suzanne Gibbs Art postcards were mailed around the world throughout September. The art that did not find owners are still available for sale.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, 100 Postcard Series, Mixed Media, varied sizes, being shipped out to lucky people.

For the time being my 100 Postcards Project has come to an end! Stay tunes for my next adventure in art and books!

Sketchbook On Tour

The sketchbookDorky Doodle Darlings ^prepare to Visit NYC, that I made for The Sketchbook Project is on tour, again! This time in Atlanta, GA.

Dorky Doodle Darlings ^prepare to Visit NYC is an illustrated Journal by Suzanne Gibbs. This little book of illustrations with a silly story about doodle darlings that are going to NYC but don’t yet realize they will be living in in NYC! Now they go to visit Atlanta, GA—this part wasn’t even IN the story!!!!

To find out more look here.

Sketchbook of Dorky Doodle Darlings

To see the book in digital format click here.

If you live in or near Atlanta big news! My sketchbook Dorky Doodle Darlings is on tour and stopping in Atlanta this weekend. September 21-23, 2018. Bonus! Read below!

Take a picture for me—of you with my Sketchbook—and I will send you 3 free copies of the printed version of my sketchbook! Thank you!

Link to the event here.

From Small to Big

I will work from small art to big art.

I tried in grad school—to make BIG art. The paintings I made were very large at 6 x 5 feet and 32 pounds, without paint. However, I fractured my fibula while moving a large painting in progress. Requiring 6 weeks of wearing a boot! Then therapy. This was a set back.

Then, I got horrible feedback/critiques from my professors on my bigger art work. My art practice is not their art, and feedback is fabulous and so…I continue.

My plan is to move from small to big, again.

My new series, Grids From Within, are personal portraits in words, paint, and collage. Each one has at least one layer of handwritten diary type writing in and on them. Going big with my internal chatter does not feel intimate. I almost feel as though I might be screaming.

So far, Parent Sandwich, below is the largest painting at a modest 24 x 24 inches. I have plans for larger works.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Parent Sandwich, Flashe paint and other media on wood cradled panel, 24 x 24 inches, $720

I started these paintings at 14 x 11 inches and 10 x 10 inches.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, My Voice Matters, Flashe paint and other media on wood cradled panel, 14 x 11 inches, $375

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Lost Voice, Flashe paint and other media on wood cradled panel, 10 x 10 inches, $300

Doubling and tripling up the process, the amount of paint, and the system I use to make these requires more of me. More mental focus and more confidence, plus of course, more time.

Before I began I wondered: Will the concept of the grids hold up to a bigger format? What size squares should I employ? Should my handwriting stay at the intimate size? As well as other internal chatter on the large vs smaller format.

I worked up incrementally. The painting below is 16 x 16 inches, I made it before I made Parent Sandwich.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, Don’t Know, Flashe paint and other media on wood cradled panel, 16 x 16 inches, $480

Even though the bigger pieces might feel like screaming to me, for the viewer the experience of a bigger painting is to be enveloped in the image and the message. An advantage worth considering while I work from small to big.

My Friend, The Sketchbook

One of my favorite things these days is my friend, the sketchbook.

My sketchbook gladly accepts scribbling.

Page spread from August 2018 sketchbook of Suzanne Gibbs.

The handwritten word lands on each page.

Page spread from August 2018 sketchbook of Suzanne Gibbs.

From other artists art I find inspiration and draw to my hearts content.

Page spread from August 2018 sketchbook of Suzanne Gibbs.

Getting glue all over the place, I make collage.

Page spread from August 2018 sketchbook of Suzanne Gibbs.

I make nothing in particular. For no particular reason and for no one in particular, except maybe me. To see more of my sketchbooks, try my YouTube channel.

Page spread from August 2018 sketchbook of Suzanne Gibbs.

I capture ideas—they come to me, they are not mine.

Page spread from August 2018 sketchbook of Suzanne Gibbs.

My sketchbook is my friend.

I am on a journey of unknown destination. My friend, the sketchbook allows the meanderings and musings to be captured, recorded, honored, and saved.

I’m in that liminal place between where I’ve been and where I’m going. I am uncomfortable and a little scared. I will stay here, in the pages of my sketchbook, until I know exactly which direction I’m headed next.

Will there ever be an exactly? A knowing? A clear and undeniable answer?

Likely, not. My sketchbook is one of my favorite things, and my friend, because I can rely on the pages to take what I have to offer.

When I need comfort, she’s here for me. When I need an outlet, he takes a beating.

Page spread from August 2018 sketchbook of Suzanne Gibbs.

My friend, the sketchbook knows that to be silly is to use one’s highest intelligence because laughter heals.

I have learned in life, that what I write down, and what I pay attention to grows and becomes  real life, eventuality. The sketchbook, knows this too and the seeds spread far and wide.

The impossible becomes possible and what is impermanent becomes permanent inside the pages of a sketchbook filled from curiosity.

Picking up images, words, and musings everywhere I go, and everyday absorbing and applying them in my friend, the sketchbook. This is a place of unrestrained containment. My favorite place to be, with a friend—myself.

Keep Making Art

Most of my followers know by now that I closed the doors to Silly Girl Factory. The question I keep getting is why? Aren’t you going to keep making art?

The answer is yes, yes I am and I will keep making art.

I will keep making art under my own name: Suzanne Gibbs.

My art will now only be sold through me or my website.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2018, OPEN, Flashe paint and other media on wood cradled panel, 16 x 16 inches, $480

Basically, these are the only changes. All other changes are hair splitting categories and arbitrary divisions.

I will keep making art, because I love sharing the work I do!

Here is a video of a happy customer. She is an Art Coach, Business Owner, advocate for the arts, and patron of the arts! Whew! Thanks Alyson B. Stanfield for all of the work you do!