Author Archives: Suzanne Gibbs

About Suzanne Gibbs

Suzanne Gibbs works industriously, making repetitive moves while working on paper or wood panels. Instead of making many perfectly executed works of art, she embraces her purposeful inaccuracies. Her fluid process of making, writing, vandalizing, creating, cutting, and repeated mark-making results in work of unrestrained containment. Her tool kit is varied and always changing including some form of paint, drawing implements, scissors, and adhesive. Suzanne has published two illustrated books and has continuously created an artist blog since 2010. She spent her formative years in Mexico and Brasil, returning to the United States in time for high school. She holds a BFA from Carnegie-Mellon University, a Master of Science degree in Communication from University of Portland, and an MFA from Claremont Graduate University. Suzanne was born in 1965 in Madison, WI and currently splits her time between California and Oregon.

Hidden Cost of Unpaid Work

My paintings make an attempt at visually introducing the idea of women’s work and unpaid labor into the imagery. In the first of the Painting Talks series of videos I began with the first painting I executed in the Shhh, Say Nothing series—the painting called Tea Cup Face (video below). The work is small at 14 x 11 inches and painted on a wood surface.

To read more about this painting jump on over to my Patreon article.

Suzanne Gibbs, ©2019, Shhh, Say Nothing Series study, Flashe paint mixed media collage.

You can view the video too!

Special Invitation

Hello Dear Art Lovers!

I have been invited to participate in Saturday Night Live Art Shows on March 27th.

You may recall that last year I was a part of a group of artists that went on Social Media on Saturday to talk about our art! Artists joined this movement from all over the world! My friend Booke Harker started the idea.
 
March 27, 2021 represents one year since the inception of this awesome social plan—bringing art to exactly were people are hanging out these days—on Social Media. Specifically on Facebook and Instagram. Although a few artists also use YouTube.
 
I will “Go Live” on Instagram on March 27 at 6PM PST. Please join me! Ask questions, make fun of me, make me laugh, or whatever. I am excited to celebrate and talk about my art—with you!
 
Here is the funny thing. When I was invited I immediately said YES, I’d love to join. I thought about what art I’d like to talk about. I snapped a picture of me with my art. Then, after I sent in the picture above—the work I was planning on talking about…. I realized that poop, I would NOT be in my studio on March 27th! And this painting lives in my studio right now! (Unless you’d like to purchase her!)

Drats!

Sooooo, my alternate plan is that I will be talking about my art, but the work I will show will be a surprise, because I will be in California where I have work hanging on the walls, but not the one pictured above called, Crowning Glory. Also, it is a rather large 36 x 36 inch painting so I will not be bringing it with me that weekend!
Mark you calendars.

I will Go Live to talk about my Art on Instagram on March 27 at 6PM PST.

My Instagram handle is: @suzannegibbsart

mental load

Imagine each of the empty jars as a mental task performed by women, on repeat. Now double the jars, and triple, and so on…

Read more about my perception of the heaviness of mental load(s) on women. The link will take you to my Patreon platform.

Sketchbook Video #29

For the past 3 years I have been sharing the finished pages of my sketchbooks. To share what is on the pages of my sketchbooks feels very vulnerable, mostly because the images on the pages are unfinished and unpolished ideas. I draw, doodle, make patterns, and create collage for myself. My sketchbooks are a form of meditation. They calm me. They are a place for ideas to spill over and make themselves known.

I was unsure when I began making videos of the pages how long I would continue to share my work in this manner. The journey has been super interesting!

Thank you to all of you who have commented and watched!

I think that my next video—video #30—could be my last shared video of my sketchbook pages. This sketchbook is already in progress! However, when and if I stop making videos this does not mean I’d stop filling the pages! Heck no. Also, I adore the accountability of letting my fans know that I have completed yet another book! 😉

Oh gosh, I don’t know! Do you love seeing these?

Enough chatter! Here is the video for you to watch!

Namasté

Virtual + Live Event!

Please join me with Neon Moon in Los Angeles:
Topic: Shhh Book Launch and Art Opening
Time: Nov 7, 2020 07:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Join the Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83018771893?pwd=UFByYzUxZ3YrNjFVWU9jdjZCMVFVZz09

Meeting ID: 830 1877 1893
Passcode: Please email me!

  1. Here is a video preview of the work.
  2. Order a copy of the Shhh book here.
  3. A recent Patreon post.
  4. All content on my YouTube channel is FREE.
  5. Stay tuned to Instagram in November and December. I plan to do more live video.

Seeing is Not Looking, Until You Look Again

As I understand it, Irwin is an artist who mainly worked with light and it’s affects on the viewer. He actually wanted to paint a painting without making a mark or a line. He wanted to teach people how to “see.” He was constantly figuring out how to make what he made look like nothing and still something.

Imagine spending a lifetime attempting to figure out how to teach people to look deeply, notice, engage, and see… what would you make to do that? How would you help people to pay attention? What would you want people to pay attention to?

Artists make work to communicate.

A portrait artist wants people to see people (usually). A landscape artist is portraying the world, land…in some form. Irwin wanted to make people curious about what they were seeing.

I was able to see some of Irwin’s work, while studying for my MFA. What I saw defies description, because as soon as I move or blink or breathe what I would see would be different from the moment before. This is sort of like the breath of yoga during poses, no breath is ever the same. No moment in life can ever happen again. The moment exists, until it doesn’t.

Irwin began his career as a painter. He is described as a conceptual artist and yet I do not think he thinks of himself as a conceptual artist at all. What he wants is for people to figure out the figuring out of what it is they are looking at. The art world is full of art-speak and philosophical mambo jumbo—Irwin’s work moves beyond these explanations.

Conditional art, with a capital “C”, is what you might think conditional might mean—does art look and say the same thing in different situations, at different times, with different people’s eyes? Personally I wonder, isn’t all art conditional? For example, a piece of gum that I chewed and my dog peed on and the car ran over and that I then pick up and I place it in a gallery on a wall in a frame—can this be art? Sure. Is this true only if I say it is art? I don’t know. But can saying that a chewed-peed-smashed-piece of gum is art really make it art? What is art? Who says it’s art? I say it is, when I make this thing.

Conditional means there are NO answers only more questions.

Many times Irwin kept working during his career and made nothing of value. Nothing that he felt he could share with an audience. He literally worked so hard to figure out how to change people’s perception that he sometimes “painted” himself into “nothing.” He called it a corner, or devastatingly “the end of his career.” The end never came to pass, he is 92 years old now, because he kept being curious, kept asking questions, kept figuring out ways to show us what seeing can be. At times he was not able to produce work that helped people to see, but he kept at it, and at it.

Ya gotta admire this! The endless curiosity. This desire to help people to see while simultaneously questioning what they are seeing.

Art generally has a frame—you can walk around it, figure it out, there may be a literal frame, or you can study the artists intent. In Irwin’s world, art is all about seeing what you see… and then seeing what you see in a next moment… Each moment changing the last because when you see you learn something, even if you don’t know that you are. I cannot really say more, he is taking his lifetime to say what he needs to say and he is asking us to see, to notice, to pay attention.

We need this more than ever.

This philosophy of noticing, of seeing, of paying close attention—we need this right now as a country and as humanity works our way through COVID-19, global warming, racial injustice issues, human issues, political land mines, and more.

Thanks for reading. Please take the time to pause and see. There might be some extra meanings in what is is I am trying to say here. Think for yourself, make art. Be curious. Make good decisions. Namasté.

The Why

Here is the why behind my most recent Book and a Series of Paintings.

If you have already read the Shhh book would you be willing to send me a written review? Thanks! I will send you a sticker as a thank you!!!

Announcing, one month from today: